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Challenges to getting ready for skiing

skiPTcynthia

Diva in Training
#1
I volunteered to collect some information on skiers for work (I’m a trainer at my local YMCA in New England). Beyond COVID:

On a “normal” year: what fitness problems do you try to address and what challenges do you face when it comes to getting in shape/ready for skiing.

Thanks to all of you for helping me with this, I appreciate the Divas weighing in on this.
 

Tvan

Angel Diva
#5
Legs, core, balance and cardio are my primary focus. I do a mix of running, yoga, Pilates, stretching and weights...all at home.
 

VickiK

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
I’m usually trying to address leg and core strength, overall flexibility (especially in my hips), and cardio.

My biggest challenge has always been cardio.
This is true for me, too, so I'm piggybacking on @MissySki 's words. The only thing I'd add to the list is balance, at least not losing any as I get older.
 

skiPTcynthia

Diva in Training
#8
I’m usually trying to address leg and core strength, overall flexibility (especially in my hips), and cardio.

My biggest challenge has always been cardio.
Thanks for answering; your answer is very helpful
This is true for me, too, so I'm piggybacking on @MissySki 's words. The only thing I'd add to the list is balance, at least not losing any as I get older.
so true with balance, one of the cases of: if you don't use
Not being under 65 anymore!!!
YES! I've found strengthening has become so much more important as I get older.
in you'll lose it (pun intended;)
 
#13
THE HIPS - I hear that! being forced out of my usual job where I get to stand and move all day, I am STUNNED at how much sitting takes a huge toll on my hips... note to self: get standing desk!
I used to commute a minimum of 3 hours per day, 4 days per week. In addition to driving 4 hours each way every weekend during ski season. Now that I'm working from home due to Covid, my hips are soooooooo much happier. I didn't realize what a toll sitting in the car, in addition to being at my desk the rest of the day, was taking. I really enjoy yoga classes that focus on hip openers, I'm very flexible but still get tight if I don't keep it up. Too much sitting makes things tight and achy.
 

skiPTcynthia

Diva in Training
#14
I used to commute a minimum of 3 hours per day, 4 days per week. In addition to driving 4 hours each way every weekend during ski season. Now that I'm working from home due to Covid, my hips are soooooooo much happier. I didn't realize what a toll sitting in the car, in addition to being at my desk the rest of the day, was taking. I really enjoy yoga classes that focus on hip openers, I'm very flexible but still get tight if I don't keep it up. Too much sitting makes things tight and achy.
yes the car used to really get me. Just last year I focused in on some serious weight lifting for my hip girdle and that has really calmed the issue when driving BUT I agree with you; I, still, stretch my hips out every day
 
#15
yes the car used to really get me. Just last year I focused in on some serious weight lifting for my hip girdle and that has really calmed the issue when driving BUT I agree with you; I, still, stretch my hips out every day
I'd love to know more about the weight lifting for that in particular. Not an aspect I've focused on for my hips.
 

Little Lightning

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#17
Four years ago, due to injuries, I started working with a Functional Movement trainer. The focus is on basic fundamental human movements-push, pull, hinge, squat, loaded carries. I use free weights, kettlebells, TRX, body weight, sled, ropes, etc. I get strength, core, cardio in one package. Before Covid I was able to dead lift my body weight.

In the summer I do week long bicycle tours and usually ride 250-300 miles in a week. When I'm home in the summer I train in the gym 3x per week. I train 1-2x per week in the winter.

I love this program because I'm not concerned with suddenly having to prepare for ski season or bike season. It's amazing how effortlessly I change from one season to another without winding up in panic mode.
 
#18
In 2019 I was focusing a lot on hip mobility.

The constant since I started ski conditioning deliberately after rehabbing a knee (not a skiing injury) in 2012 is balance. In particular 1-leg balance. Also keeping hamstrings strong to help support knees. Core strength became a focus after a year or so of using the TRX and realizing how much it was helping not only my skiing, but also my ability to drive long distances to get to ski resorts since I don't live in ski country.
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#20
I do something active every day. Most days it's a spin class on my Echelon bike or an online dance cardio class with Shine Dance Fitness. I follow up both with half an hour of weights. Occasionally I'll get out on my real bike or walk five miles around the lake near my house. I also do 25 minutes of yoga every morning, before breakfast. I agree with @Little Lightning ; working out all the time makes transitioning into ski season a heck of a lot easier.
 

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