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Question: BP 82s?

#1
Hi gals!

I have the opportunity to demo some Black Pearl 82s tomorrow. I’m not so good at telling the difference between one ski and another. What should I look for? Other than just skiing my present skis (Blizzard Quattro) and then the BPs down the same trail, anything I should do?

I was wondering about my slightly less capable, less steady skiing through bumped up soft snow, and @Abbi feels it’s a technique problem, and unlikely to change with a different pair of skis. That was the only thing I could think of to try to compare.

I read a lot about skis that are playful, turny, planks, responsive, stiff, with torsional strength - I thought a few years on skis would make all this somehow clearer in my mind. Fortunately I have the opportunity to demo, and I’m going to try to learn this vocabulary in my body!

Anybody have ideas?
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#2
If you don’t like them better- have more fun with - than your current skis... keep looking. Ski 2 runs with your current skis. Then ski the same 2 runs with theBPs, then again with your current skis. Only if you like them better than your current skis, should you consider buying them. If you do like them better, now go try them in other conditions on other runs. The reason for going back to your own skis for one run is to allow for the muscles having loosened up further and it gives you a true comparison. The most important thing to look for is fun factor! Don’t worry beyond that.
 

NYSnowflake

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#3
Hi gals!

I have the opportunity to demo some Black Pearl 82s tomorrow. I’m not so good at telling the difference between one ski and another. What should I look for? Other than just skiing my present skis (Blizzard Quattro) and then the BPs down the same trail, anything I should do?

I was wondering about my slightly less capable, less steady skiing through bumped up soft snow, and @Abbi feels it’s a technique problem, and unlikely to change with a different pair of skis. That was the only thing I could think of to try to compare.

I read a lot about skis that are playful, turny, planks, responsive, stiff, with torsional strength - I thought a few years on skis would make all this somehow clearer in my mind. Fortunately I have the opportunity to demo, and I’m going to try to learn this vocabulary in my body!

Anybody have ideas?
My new Head Total Joys KILL IT in tracked out crud. It’s a completely different experience skiing on them compared with my K2 amp skis from last year. The skis do make a difference. I got thrown around, bounced around, or just stopped on the K2 Amp Strikes in crud. The Head Total Joys just cut through, or sail over anything that’s in front of them. I was airborne very briefly a couple of times on Monday at Hunter. But I didn’t fall. Those skis are sick!
 

Analisa

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#4
I take pictures of the ski/length so that I don't forget, and then take a picture of the pair in profile. I definitely think getting on a handful of skis is important for being able to digest some of the more technical reviews. A few spots I pay attention to:

-Flex (both overall, as well as whether it's more uniform across the ski or stiff underfoot with flexibility in the tips/tails, likewise, whether the flex is directional with soft tips & stiff tails or symmetrical from the center to extremities).
-Turn radius (changes as the ski bends, but combined with the flex, gives me an idea of how hard the ski is to turn).
-Mount point (closer to center = more maneuverable/playful & further back on the ski = more stability/more traditional).
-Sidewalls, cap construction, or hybrid (sidewalls = more torsional rigidity/better carving, cap = more pop, lighter weight, more affordable.)
-Flat or rockered tail (flat = locks you into a carve and provides stability, rockered = turns release easily for a really surfy feel)

And then I look at tip shape:
-Amount of taper (are the tips almost pointy, like a Dynastar Legend, or really blunt like a carving ski)
-Rocker, both the length along the ski (rocker depth) and how high it raises up off the snow (tip splay)
-Amount of "positive camber" or the height of the little thigh gap when you put the skis base to base.

At first, definitely just try lots of skis and buy the ones you love. But over time, I really liked to understand why some brands make skis with similar sizes - like Armada's Trace 98 vs. ARW 96 - and why I gravitated towards certain skis. It also makes it easier to take the giant list of skis for my size and prioritize the ones to demo that I think are the best fit.
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#5
Follow the advice from @mustski .

When I started demo'ing a dozen years ago, I was an advanced intermediate and didn't know terminology or care much about the variations in ski design besides length and width. Only recently started paying attention to turn radius. I'd just ask for the shortest skis available since I'm petite. I would try skis on the same trail, usually two runs until I really hated them on the first run. That applied on short runs at Massanutten, as well as the longer runs at Alta. Didn't take too long to figure out which brands I tended to like and which felt like too much work.

Have fun demo'ing!
 
#7
Are any brands other than Blizzard permitted at your house?! :wink:
He has given me a couple of Dynastars that strayed into his orbit. Also suggested I try the new Volkl Flairs. He is branching out in his old age!
 
#8
@mustski - Your advice parallels that of Mr. Blizzard, who says I must ski the same trail three times (exactly) on each ski. But I think going back to my own skis after trying the new ones makes lots of sense. Both for warming up, and for trying to see what feels different, and comparing back.

@Analisa - Some day I will be able to keep track of many variables like this! I still have to put a fair amount of energy into getting down the trail in one piece, so there’s not as much room left for actual thought. :laughter:
 
#9
Hey all!

These skis are FUN! Easier to ski than my Quattros! I got a full course on rocker and camber, and why it was good that I learned to ski without a full rocker and why I would like it. I do.
 
#10
Demoing was by far one the the best things I did for myself back in the spring. I learned so much about ski design, what I like, and lengths. I couldn't believe how quickly I could tell if a ski would work for me or not. Reviews say the new Vantage 90 Ti is lively and playful. I demoed them and they felt like lifeless planks. Sure, I could drive them but they were just meh. Same thing with the Dynastar Legends and Armadas I tried. I wasn't sure about the Head Kore 93w when I took it out. It's fairly stiff yet light. The first few turns are just OK but I found center and pushed them and two runs later I didn't want to give them back I was having so much fun. They are now in my basement waiting for the bindings arriving today. :-D The Rossi E88 were almost just as fun. I learned that day that I don't like the feel of two sheets of metal as they don't jive with my more relaxed, playful style of skiing. I'm not the hard charger like my husband. I've now convinced him he needs longer skis and needs to demo, which he can do on our next trip. Yay!
 
#11
Hi gals!

I have the opportunity to demo some Black Pearl 82s tomorrow. I’m not so good at telling the difference between one ski and another. What should I look for? Other than just skiing my present skis (Blizzard Quattro) and then the BPs down the same trail, anything I should do?
I have Blizzard Quattro 8.0cas. I have not found them to fun when the snow gets bumped up or spring like. I find I really have to pay attention to keep them on edge to get thru chopped up/bumpy areas. Just too much work for me. I love them for hard snow days and even a few inches of fresh over hard groomed! Perfect for morning runs when there's gas in the tank. I leave my husband in the dust on those runs. LOL. My Alluvit 88s are good for post-lunch, tired leg runs when I'm not looking to charge and prefer to poke around and take it easy finding those soft areas on the sides of the trail or making nice short turns down the trail (dancing with the mountain as I call it).
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#12
Hey all!

These skis are FUN! Easier to ski than my Quattros! I got a full course on rocker and camber, and why it was good that I learned to ski without a full rocker and why I would like it. I do.
I really liked them when testing last winter. I agree with what was said above that yes, the different construction can make a very big difference off-piste, but I also agree that technique plays into it.
Are you buying them?
 

Candebsna

Diva in Training
#13
Hey all!

These skis are FUN! Easier to ski than my Quattros! I got a full course on rocker and camber, and why it was good that I learned to ski without a full rocker and why I would like it. I do.
Good to hear! I ordered a pair of BP 82s on black Friday when I found a good deal. Keeping my fingers crossed that I love them.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#18
Apparently I am getting them for Christmas!
Well that's exciting!
I really think a lot of women would love them. Even the 88 "haters". They're easy and playful but can step up the game if you ask them to.
 

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