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Boot/foot comfort

mmechinus

Diva in Training
I've skied 1-2 times a year for most of my life. I have always rented my boots and skis, and never had a problem. I skied two times in 2022 and had different problems-shins and calves for the first time.

I bought ski boots for my last trip. I wore them around my house before as much as I could, but obviously they needed to be broken in. I skied in them for two days and was miserable. The bottoms of my feet hurt so bad after just a few runs. The only other thing that was different when I last skied was my skis. I rented Elan Ripsticks (don't remember exact model). I noticed that these skis didn't get as narrow near my boot as other skis I had used before.

Can anyone weigh in on if this sounds like a boot, ski or both problem? Any thoughts on how to prevent this? I returned the boots and plan to rent again.

I know this is rambling, but I love to ski and have never had a problem until recently. I'm not skiing long enough or often enough to be able to troubleshoot very much while on the mountain, so trying to come up with a game plan before my next trip.
 

diymom

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Not so sure about the shin and calf pain from your last rental boots in '22, could be a different forward lean than previous rental boots? Every brand is different. On the boots that you bought-- did you get any aftermarket insoles? It could be that your foot needs more support (which can also change with age, life circumstances like being pregnant, etc.) I'm not sure renting again is the solution, since the boots you get will always be a gamble. But only skiing one or two days a year makes the investment in a properly fitted boot (and possibly insole) a tough sell. Depending on where you live, the compromise might be a season rental from a reputable shop that can offer a few brand options, check fit, and if needed address footbed issues too.
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
Not so sure about the shin and calf pain from your last rental boots in '22, could be a different forward lean than previous rental boots? Every brand is different. On the boots that you bought-- did you get any aftermarket insoles? It could be that your foot needs more support (which can also change with age, life circumstances like being pregnant, etc.) I'm not sure renting again is the solution, since the boots you get will always be a gamble. But only skiing one or two days a year makes the investment in a properly fitted boot (and possibly insole) a tough sell. Depending on where you live, the compromise might be a season rental from a reputable shop that can offer a few brand options, check fit, and if needed address footbed issues too.
I did buy some insoles from Sun and Ski when I bought the boots. I just wonder if it’s a problem to buy since I don’t ski often enough to break them in quickly?
 

scandium

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
A good fit shouldn't need THAT much breaking in. Did they guarantee the fit? Can you go back and get them to troubleshoot? FWIW my boots have only ever hurt me in the areas that needed punching out (bunions/navicular/bunionettes) and both I and the fitter knew we were trying to keep the fit snug, but still allow enough space. Foot pain sounds like the insole might be wrong for you...
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
What type of foot pain? Pressure, cramping, numbness...?

Could be stiffer or softer or tighter boots. Or just a poor all around fit for your foot, ankle, and calf.

Maybe a footbed adapted to your foot would help. Maybe not.

While likely not the sole cause of your pain, a wider ski might force you to do weird movements especially if the boot is too big. I definitely feel a different fatigue or discomfort if I am on wide skis and not being precise in my technique.

Might be worth trying the boots on a narrowish easy to ski set of boards before giving up on the boots.

Maybe a boot fitting session with a good fitter is worthy. Beware though as their work and income sometimes is based on selling people new boots even when the person comes in with new boots. Most of the time they are probably spot on though.

Will you get to ski again soon...or next year? Keep us posted please.
 

Pequenita

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Sometimes it does take a while for feet to get use to insoles/footbeds, especially if you don't have that kind of support in your other shoes. The arch often feels like it's in the wrong place. And then with the entire boot, sometimes bodies aren't used to having the foot and lower hugged for so long. So, infrequent skiing can be part of it.

It's tough to tell where the issue is based on your description, but it's not the ski, other than your body may be moving weirdly to adjust to the width. :smile: It's the boots.
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
What type of foot pain? Pressure, cramping, numbness...?

Could be stiffer or softer or tighter boots. Or just a poor all around fit for your foot, ankle, and calf.

Maybe a footbed adapted to your foot would help. Maybe not.

While likely not the sole cause of your pain, a wider ski might force you to do weird movements especially if the boot is too big. I definitely feel a different fatigue or discomfort if I am on wide skis and not being precise in my technique.

Might be worth trying the boots on a narrowish easy to ski set of boards before giving up on the boots.

Maybe a boot fitting session with a good fitter is worthy. Beware though as their work and income sometimes is based on selling people new boots even when the person comes in with new boots. Most of the time they are probably spot on though.

Will you get to ski again soon...or next year? Keep us posted please.
I will be skiing again in late November, and early Jan. Probably again in March.

The pain on the bottom of the foot was sharp. I didn't notice any pressure, cramping or numbness.

I actually returned the boots as soon as I got home from my last trip. Someone suggested a seasonal rental, maybe I will do that. I was just so thrown off because I'd never had that problem before and I have rented so many pairs of boots before.

Thank you for your input, I appreciate it!
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
Sometimes it does take a while for feet to get use to insoles/footbeds, especially if you don't have that kind of support in your other shoes. The arch often feels like it's in the wrong place. And then with the entire boot, sometimes bodies aren't used to having the foot and lower hugged for so long. So, infrequent skiing can be part of it.

It's tough to tell where the issue is based on your description, but it's not the ski, other than your body may be moving weirdly to adjust to the width. :smile: It's the boots.
Yeah, it's hard to describe! It just really hurt, haha! I'd never experienced anything like that before, so it really threw me off. Thanks for responding to my post!
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
A good fit shouldn't need THAT much breaking in. Did they guarantee the fit? Can you go back and get them to troubleshoot? FWIW my boots have only ever hurt me in the areas that needed punching out (bunions/navicular/bunionettes) and both I and the fitter knew we were trying to keep the fit snug, but still allow enough space. Foot pain sounds like the insole might be wrong for you...
That is good to know about the insole! I returned them as soon as I got home, haha! I have a credit and can go back again, but I plan on using that credit for other gear. I'm going to look more into some insoles. Thanks for your input!!
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
Not so sure about the shin and calf pain from your last rental boots in '22, could be a different forward lean than previous rental boots? Every brand is different. On the boots that you bought-- did you get any aftermarket insoles? It could be that your foot needs more support (which can also change with age, life circumstances like being pregnant, etc.) I'm not sure renting again is the solution, since the boots you get will always be a gamble. But only skiing one or two days a year makes the investment in a properly fitted boot (and possibly insole) a tough sell. Depending on where you live, the compromise might be a season rental from a reputable shop that can offer a few brand options, check fit, and if needed address footbed issues too.
The seasonal rental is a good idea! I did buy insoles when I purchased the boots. I know there are places where you stand on something and it reads your foot and where you are putting pressure when you stand and move, I might look into that. Thanks for the input!!
 

AJM

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Could it be the fact that you've previously had rental boots that to be honest are never generally a good fit and now you've got a pair that do actually fit and your feet are like "Yikes!!! whats going on" .
I know that a friend of mine who only ski's around 1-2 times a year and has boots that are waaaay old and waaaay ill fitting would be screaming in pain if she were to try and ski in a properly fitted boot.
Just a thought x
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
Not so sure about the shin and calf pain from your last rental boots in '22, could be a different forward lean than previous rental boots? Every brand is different. On the boots that you bought-- did you get any aftermarket insoles? It could be that your foot needs more support (which can also change with age, life circumstances like being pregnant, etc.) I'm not sure renting again is the solution, since the boots you get will always be a gamble. But only skiing one or two days a year makes the investment in a properly fitted boot (and possibly insole) a tough sell. Depending on where you live, the compromise might be a season rental from a reputable shop that can offer a few brand options, check fit, and if needed address footbed issues too.

Could it be the fact that you've previously had rental boots that to be honest are never generally a good fit and now you've got a pair that do actually fit and your feet are like "Yikes!!! whats going on" .
I know that a friend of mine who only ski's around 1-2 times a year and has boots that are waaaay old and waaaay ill fitting would be screaming in pain if she were to try and ski in a properly fitted boot.
Just a thought x
Good thought, maybe! But I don't have time to figure that out, haha! I plan on moving in a few years and will be able to ski way more and then can really put time into finding the perfect fit. I will say that the pain prevented me from skiing, so it seems like they were just a bad fit.
 

Eera

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Can't talk about technicalities, just experience: I had the same with my boots; first few outings really bad pain in the first few runs, I'd take some panadol then it'd be OK for the rest of the day. After the Covid hiatus we went to NZ and I nearly threw up because of the pain in my foot, it was miserable - I think it might have been a change in foot shape due to weight fluctuations or something. Anyway, went back to my bootfitter who did black magic and witchcraft, and now they're fine; it seems that tweaks are needed periodically to keep a good fit.
 

Rashika

Certified Ski Diva
I'm having a similar issue with my new boots, although with 12 outings now they are much more worn in.

That pain is actually what brought me here and although I haven't been able to sort it out yet I'm definitely going back to the shop to see if we can do more. I have custom footbeds but my toes basically go numb after an hour (now, it was more like 15 mins in the beginning) then tingly then the pain starts and I have to remove my boot as I basically can't stand, worse on my right foot than my left. I can manage about 2 hours now before I have to stop.
It's frustrating cos I feel the boot fits me well, I have no sharp spots and a snug fit all round, I can wiggle my toes comfortablly, but not too much, and not hitting the end. I suspect it's the beginning of Morton's so I want to see what can be done, besides me having to stop after 2 hours.
Oh and if I rest the feet for about 15mins I can put the boots back on no problem, the toes seem to recover and I can ski again for another hour or two, then have to rest again.
And I have never had this pain in any other shoes, only ski boots. I tried some stretchy metatarsal pads on Wednesday but that did not last long, was just as bad if not worse than before.
I'm enjoying the skiing but not this pain!
 

Rashika

Certified Ski Diva
Good thought, maybe! But I don't have time to figure that out, haha! I plan on moving in a few years and will be able to ski way more and then can really put time into finding the perfect fit. I will say that the pain prevented me from skiing, so it seems like they were just a bad fit.
Hopefully u can get the perfect fit! Ski boots are the shoes from satan I reckon.
Andsorry didn't mean to steal your thread but I've been interested in reading the responses. :smile:
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
Can't talk about technicalities, just experience: I had the same with my boots; first few outings really bad pain in the first few runs, I'd take some panadol then it'd be OK for the rest of the day. After the Covid hiatus we went to NZ and I nearly threw up because of the pain in my foot, it was miserable - I think it might have been a change in foot shape due to weight fluctuations or something. Anyway, went back to my bootfitter who did black magic and witchcraft, and now they're fine; it seems that tweaks are needed periodically to keep a good fit.
That sounds awful! This is good to know though, thanks so much for sharing.
 

mmechinus

Diva in Training
I'm having a similar issue with my new boots, although with 12 outings now they are much more worn in.

That pain is actually what brought me here and although I haven't been able to sort it out yet I'm definitely going back to the shop to see if we can do more. I have custom footbeds but my toes basically go numb after an hour (now, it was more like 15 mins in the beginning) then tingly then the pain starts and I have to remove my boot as I basically can't stand, worse on my right foot than my left. I can manage about 2 hours now before I have to stop.
It's frustrating cos I feel the boot fits me well, I have no sharp spots and a snug fit all round, I can wiggle my toes comfortablly, but not too much, and not hitting the end. I suspect it's the beginning of Morton's so I want to see what can be done, besides me having to stop after 2 hours.
Oh and if I rest the feet for about 15mins I can put the boots back on no problem, the toes seem to recover and I can ski again for another hour or two, then have to rest again.
And I have never had this pain in any other shoes, only ski boots. I tried some stretchy metatarsal pads on Wednesday but that did not last long, was just as bad if not worse than before.
I'm enjoying the skiing but not this pain!
That is so frustrating! I hope you get it figured out soon.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
.... I have custom footbeds but my toes basically go numb after an hour (now, it was more like 15 mins in the beginning) then tingly then the pain starts and I have to remove my boot as I basically can't stand, worse on my right foot than my left. I can manage about 2 hours now before I have to stop.
....
This description is right on target for Morton's Neuroma.
Numbness...
then tingles...
followed by serious pain.
After the shooting pain you can also feel like hot lava is filling the boot starting at the toes. (!!!)

I've had the exact same thing happen. I remember the day I felt hot lava filling my boot in the toe box. I sat down on the snow and removed the boots fast in desperation. It was difficult to get them back on, but at least I did prove to myself that there was no hot lava in there. My toes weren't even warm.

So if I'm right and you have Morton's neuroma, that means a nerve in the foot that leads to two toes is getting pinched by two bones in the ball-of-foot area. The bones collapse towards each other and they finally get close enough to pinch the nerve in between them. The nerve screams in pain, and you feel it. The numbness and tingles usually happen first before shooting pain.

If this pain goes on repeatedly, day after day, the nerve can get inflamed. Even if you get the problem fixed (see below), the inflammation needs to subside before you can go back to skiing without pain.

There's an easy fix for many skiers suffering with Morton's. Your bootfitter can attach a shim to the bottom of your custom footbed, somewhere in the ball-of-foot area. That shim will raise the two bones that are rubbing against each other and pinching that nerve. Raising the bones will keep them apart. It may take a few modifications to get the shim in the exact right spot and the right height to stop the pain. If the nerve is inflamed, it will hurt even after the fix. You'll need to wait for it to calm down before skiing pain-free.

Another issue may be that the toe box of the boot is too narrow at the ball-of-foot area. This also is easy to fix if you have a good bootfitter with the proper tools to widen the toe box. Be careful with widening though. When the ball-of-foot area is widened, the bootfitter may overcompensate and render your boots too wide. My suggestion is to try the shim fix first.
 
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