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Question: Are the any Knitting Ski Divas in the Group?

Kimmyt

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I don't knit, but at the ski clinic I attended this weekend, our photog (and super-cool sis of our super-cool instructor) mentioned that she has a knitting blog and does knitting instruction. I checked it out, even though I don't knit, and it looks really interesting.

www.knitfreedom.com

She also takes great photos!
 

Lola

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
:Bump:

So given that there will be alot of rain this weekend with Hurricane Irene, I have decided to try a new skill - knitting! I got all the stuff to knit the obligatory first project - a scarf. Any advice? I have found quite a few videos on line to help me get started.

I could use some translation help, though. What does this mean?
Row 1: S|1 purlwise wyib, *yo, K2tog, K1* to last st, K1
Row 2: S|1 purlwise wyif, *yo, P2tog, P1* to last st, P1

:noidea:
 

BackCountryGirl

Angel Diva
Row 1: S/1 purlwise wyib means slip one stitch purlwise with the yarn in back . So, you pretend you are going to purl by sticking the right needle into the stitch on the left, but just slip it to the right, don't use the yarn, just carry it in back. YO, K2tog means wrap the yarn over the right needle, knit next two stitches stitches together. Then knit one. Repeat until the last stitch, then knit that last stitch.

Row 2: S/1 purlwise wyif means to slip the first stitch purlwise -- this time, hold the yarn in front. Yo P2tog, P1 means do that yarn over thing, then purl two together, then purl 1. Repeat until there's one stitch left and purl it.

This is a simple lacy pattern -- should be easy. The slipped stitches at the start of the row makes for a nice chained edge on each side.
Row 2: S.
 

Lola

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
This is a simple lacy pattern -- should be easy.
Right! That's why I picked it! Simple lacy pattern sounds great and thanks for the translation. I really appreciate it. I got some nice and really soft alpaca yarn at the store. Lana, the clerk there, helped me take the skien and turn it into a ball with a fancy (well, actually not that fancy) turning thingy. She also sold me some straight, bamboo needles. She said they would be perfect for a scarf project. No need to worry about all the curvy needles and such, just sticking to the basics for now. Anyway, this was the easiest thing I could find for a beginner project. I think everything sounds a bit complicated to get started, but I am guessing that after about 10 rows or so, I will get into a rhythm. I have read that the hardest thing with getting started is keeping an even tension.
 

VickiK

Angel Diva
I'm a knitter. Next stop on my surfin' safari: Ravelry. See ya here or there!

I love to knit while traveling to the snow.
 

ChgoSkier

Certified Ski Diva
Right! That's why I picked it! Simple lacy pattern sounds great and thanks for the translation. I really appreciate it. I got some nice and really soft alpaca yarn at the store. Lana, the clerk there, helped me take the skien and turn it into a ball with a fancy (well, actually not that fancy) turning thingy. She also sold me some straight, bamboo needles. She said they would be perfect for a scarf project. No need to worry about all the curvy needles and such, just sticking to the basics for now. Anyway, this was the easiest thing I could find for a beginner project. I think everything sounds a bit complicated to get started, but I am guessing that after about 10 rows or so, I will get into a rhythm. I have read that the hardest thing with getting started is keeping an even tension.

Just like skiing, practice, practice, practice! You'll get the hang of it in no time. :-)

I'd love to see a picture of your progress or your finished scarf!
 

ChgoSkier

Certified Ski Diva
Any projects in your queue?

Any knitters (or crocheters) start on some winter or ski season projects yet? I'm always on the look out for suggestions.
 

Swissly1

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I did knit and crochet as a child and kept on doing it until the girls became teenagers about 10 years ago. From that point on nobody wanted to wear anything that was knitted or crocheted and I stopped. Too bad, I still do have wool and yarn and lots of patterns and suggestions, but all are written in German. I never did use a guideline in English. I probably could knit a scarf with a simple pattern and ski at the same time.
 

astridhj

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Then maybe you should start knitting again? I have become a very active knitter lately and I knit mostly hats, shawls and sweathers these days. There are so much nice yarn and patterns available now that I did not know about 10 years ago when I last was active. Or maybe I just did not know where to look for it.
 

Swissly1

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Yes Astrid, you are so right and I will start knitting again,when I know that the finished project will be used.
How are you doing in Norway? Do you feel colder temperatures already?
 

astridhj

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Yes, it is nice to knit when it is used afterwards. I love using knitting products, even nicer if i have made them myself.

We are still months away from winter, but hope they open the ski resorts in the beginning of November. People have started to book their winter holidays to the Alps, and I have started to look around and see where I want to go next year. I am planning the Alps for one week and then a long week in the US if I can find the money for it.
 

Lola

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
So - update from me.

I tried with the help of videos online to knit during the hurricane, but I was not successful.

However, last friday I was visiting with my parents, and whoda thunk that my dad (Mr. LilGeorg) knew how to knit. You see he learned at church around the time he was in middle school. Everyone had to pick an activity, and he picked knitting because lots of girls picked knitting. And he wanted to hang around lots of girls.

In any event, he taught me and by Sunday I was knitting and purling rather nicely. This evening, I even went crazy with a knit one, purl two pattern - whoa! I'm in the big leagues now! :clap:
 

deannatoby

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Gets me intrigued. I dearly love wool, but it seems today that the huge majority of wool sweaters are either cashmere or really fine (translation: thin) merino. I want an old-fashioned thick wool sweater, and a little itch is fine because I want to wear it under a camisole and a cozy turtleneck. I did see some this summer...at specialty boutiques charging well over $200 per sweater. Granted, they were handmade out of great wool, but, oh my goodness! Maybe knitting is the way to go. (Unless good wool yarn costs $200.)

How long before you become sweater-competent? I can see myself spending the next ten years on scarves.

"Please, won't you take another scarf?"

"No, Deanna! You've already given me fifteen!"

I guess scarves are better than potholders. That's as far as I got when I was ten.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
Check out craft shows, fall is the best time for these. Also check in with a wool shoppe. Many have knitters that will make your sweater for you for a $$. I got behind in a project (also I just couldn't figure it out) and had someone else finish it for me.

Vogue knitting has some really easy projects in this month's magazine.
 

BackCountryGirl

Angel Diva
Deannatoby--absent a patient friend or family member who'd teach you (Lola, that's too funny!), I'd find the nearest local yarn shop or an adult education class in a nearby school district. In New England, every town has a knitting class in its adult ed offerings, it seems. While one can learn by reading (or even watching you tube videos these days), knitting is a very visual thing, and sometimes it really helps to have somebody show you. While it is nice to find good deals on yarn on line, there's nothing better than having a relationship with a good yarn shop! The other day, I was totally stumped by the phrasing in a pattern (and I've been knitting for nearly 42 years) and stopped into the lys I go to to buy some needles I didn't have and needed, and to ask about the phrasing. Sure enough, a nice, older European women translated the phrase and I was on my way. You're in the lakes region -- my goodness, you have one of the best shops in New England -- Patternworks. Very beginner friendly place! The website is www.patternworks.com. My suggestion for a good beginner project is an afghan or throw with squares all the same size. That way, you can experiment with different techniques in each square and learn how to sew knitting together. Then, you'll give up sewing things together because it is so tedious and knit sweaters from the top down or bottom up on circulars to eliminate that headache!
 

Tvan

Angel Diva
Yankee Knitter designs some really easy patterns. I've done several of her sweaters and found them easy to follow. Her website is: https://www.yankeeknitterdesigns.com/index.html and you can probably find her patterns in most New England knitting stores. I'll post some pics when I get a chance.
 

Swissly1

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
So - update from me.

I tried with the help of videos online to knit during the hurricane, but I was not successful.

However, last friday I was visiting with my parents, and whoda thunk that my dad (Mr. LilGeorg) knew how to knit. You see he learned at church around the time he was in middle school. Everyone had to pick an activity, and he picked knitting because lots of girls picked knitting. And he wanted to hang around lots of girls.

In any event, he taught me and by Sunday I was knitting and purling rather nicely. This evening, I even went crazy with a knit one, purl two pattern - whoa! I'm in the big leagues now! :clap:

Super and congratulations! That's great, that you got help from dad. I know it's kind of difficult to learn knitting on your own even with some instructions you can watch or read. What are you knitting now? A scarf to begin with? Will you show a picture?
 

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