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Any birders? Share your photos!

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
Honestly, I just let the bees and wasps do their thing (I don't get that many, and they seem to prefer my flowers), BUT, I have heard moving your hummingbird feeders around helps with that. Apparently bees take longer to find new locations and hummingbirds will spot it quickly.
 
I’ve been enjoying my hummingbirds so much, I’m so sad that they’ll be migrating soon. The complicated thing at the moment is that we are having a big problem with EEE locally, and the state is going to spray for mosquitoes. I really dislike the use of widespread chemicals like this, but there are also 4 people and a few horses dead already and no cure for the disease so it needs to be done. The local Facebook groups are going nuts with discussion. As a chemist, everything I read shows that the supposed exposure levels should not cause an issue for birds.. The masses are freaking out about taking in bird feeders etc. So I took mine in last night out of an abundance of caution, but they didn’t end up spraying due to temperatures being too cool last night so I put my hummingbird feeder back out today. I didn’t put the seeds back out yet because it was still dark out when I was leaving and the seed feeders are on the tree-line where I wasn’t willing to go at that time due to more mosquito potential. I’m not sure if I’m doing more harm by removing the food source and confusing them, or if it’s the best for them not to potentially eat contaminated food. For the hummingbirds the timing worries me most because they need their fuel to migrate really soon.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
Hmmm... yeah, it does seem like if you know when they are spraying, it can't hurt to take down the feeders during that time. I wouldn't be overly worried about temporarily removing feeders - wild birds have multiple sources of food, and can adapt. I mean, in normal situations, they're going to have patches of thistles and sunflowers and whatnot that get picked clean or are suddenly occupied by predators or whatever and they have to shift around and find something else. And people regularly have feeders that sit empty for a while - I think they're able to deal with it.
 

Little Lightning

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Two Great Horned Owls flew over my house this morning. They perched in a large tree so I got a nice long look at them.

I might have solved my hummingbird feeder issue by covering the ports with mesh. The hummingbird seems to be using it. Silly bees are persistent though. They can't get through the mesh but keep trying. I moved it to a shadier spot but that hasn't deterred the bees.
 

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