• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add webmaster@theskidiva.com to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

ACL Avulsion fracture

2ski2moro

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#1
54th season of skiing and my first ever season-ending injury.

I refuse to surrender.

This was a freak accident. Bluebird day. Soft snow. I was heading down a narrow (12’ wide) bump run. A tree branch had fallen across the trail and everyone had gone around it, causing a deep rut. I misjudged the bump and somehow got into the ruts everyone else made. I got kicked backwards, or I maybe I leaned back. I tried to jackknife myself forward, but I didn't have enough time. I hit the uphill side of the bump and the snow pushed my skis to the right. That move, with a full knee bend, and something had to give. I really thought ACL when I heard the pop. (my skis were parallel and the bindings did not release)

My friend helped me take off my skis. She called the emergency number for a ski patroller sled, set her skis up as a warning to other skiers and we waited.

I took the Ride of Shame. Props to Killington Ski Patrol, the guy was so skilled taking me down the steep, bumped run.

I went to the on-hill emergency clinic. It was a good choice, IMO. It wasn’t busy and these folks treat knees and shoulders every day. I liked the doctor and the staff was kind. The initial diagnosis was a tibial plateau fracture.

CT at my orthopedist later showed that the tibial plateau was depressed but not broken. I was told that the Tibial Plateau is like styrofoam and the depression is like pushing your thumb into the styrofoam.

The avulsion is a piece of bone that attaches the ACL to the tibia. It is displaced 6mm.

The initial treatment plan is immobilization in a knee brace. Surgery is not indicated.

Anyone else? I would love to hear your experiences.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#2
Gah I'm sorry to hear this! I suffered a TPF 5 years ago (I can't believe it's been that long already!) My advice to you is to be diligent in allowing it to heal, and get an MRI at a minimum. I found out 3 years later that not only did I suffer a TPF, I also tore my LCL which gives me grief to this day. So, push for getting as much information about the injury you have been diagnosed with, and other "sub-injuries" that might have occurred that haven't been diagnosed. The knee is a complicated joint, and collateral damage is not unusual or unheard of when you suffer a serious knee injury.

Hang in there!! And do your PT faithfully when that time comes. Oh, and cycling is awesome healing for most knee injuries!
 
#4
Oh, so sorry that happened to you! I’m glad to hear that Killington treated you right. Best of luck with the treatment and rehab.
 

vickie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#5
Oof, sorry your season ended so ugly. Is the treatment also non-weight bearing?

I had a proximal tibia fracture ... crutches and full-length brace for 6 weeks, then test to see if the ACL was shot. That was the hardest part -- going thru 6 weeks to see if I got sent back to GO. Fortunately, my ACL tested strong, though the MRI showed damage. I was advised to wear a brace for skiing, just to keep what ACL I have.
 

Peaheartsmama

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
Sending hugs and positive thoughts. I just wanted you to know that you can get past this. I’m in my third season post two full ACL tears within about 14 months of each other. I wear two braces and they are now part of my ski setup just like my poles. Here’s to a full recovery for you. Ask if PT can help the recovery as well. I think that was a huge part of mine. Hugs!
 
#8
54th season of skiing and my first ever season-ending injury.

I refuse to surrender.

This was a freak accident. Bluebird day. Soft snow. I was heading down a narrow (12’ wide) bump run. A tree branch had fallen across the trail and everyone had gone around it, causing a deep rut. I misjudged the bump and somehow got into the ruts everyone else made. I got kicked backwards, or I maybe I leaned back. I tried to jackknife myself forward, but I didn't have enough time. I hit the uphill side of the bump and the snow pushed my skis to the right. That move, with a full knee bend, and something had to give. I really thought ACL when I heard the pop. (my skis were parallel and the bindings did not release)

My friend helped me take off my skis. She called the emergency number for a ski patroller sled, set her skis up as a warning to other skiers and we waited.

I took the Ride of Shame. Props to Killington Ski Patrol, the guy was so skilled taking me down the steep, bumped run.

I went to the on-hill emergency clinic. It was a good choice, IMO. It wasn’t busy and these folks treat knees and shoulders every day. I liked the doctor and the staff was kind. The initial diagnosis was a tibial plateau fracture.

CT at my orthopedist later showed that the tibial plateau was depressed but not broken. I was told that the Tibial Plateau is like styrofoam and the depression is like pushing your thumb into the styrofoam.

The avulsion is a piece of bone that attaches the ACL to the tibia. It is displaced 6mm.

The initial treatment plan is immobilization in a knee brace. Surgery is not indicated.

Anyone else? I would love to hear your experiences.
Me... I had avulsion fracture to ACL from literally getting off a lift in Switzerland (Portes du Soleil) and standing there. Someone backed into me and I went down. MRI showed avulsion fracture to ACL and meniscus flap tear.
Healed with PT .... no surgery.
 

2ski2moro

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#14
I am so lucky. And happy. At the visit with the orthopedist, I told him my concerns. I don't want to be judged by the number of days I have lived or how my body has changed into a post menopausal-apple shape. I want to ski and hike and kayak and travel. I don't want to be treated like an overweight, old lady.

Then, I asked him about the staple fixation arthroscopic surgery to speed up my healing. He looked me in the eye and said, "If you were my wife, I would not allow anyone to perform surgery for your injury."

He said that he doesn't feel any laxity in my ACL. And even better news, I have little or no arthritis in my knee. The muscle development in my legs not only protected my ACL, but also it will help my healing. I can tell you that this woman of advanced years was quite flattered. :becky:

The doctor prescribed a hinged neoprene brace, partial weight bearing with crutches, and physio to begin on Friday, just 15 days after the date of the fracture. I'm thrilled.

I will not surrender!
 

2ski2moro

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#18
Actually, TheSkiDiva had a role in finding this doctor.

Skinnyfootskis started a conversation with me asking for info for her upcoming Killington visit. As the conversation continued, we discovered that we had a lot in common off the slopes, including that she lives in CT. I moved to CT last year!

When I got hurt, she recommended her orthopedist, whose office just a few miles down the road from me.

We met in person for the first time at my house after my accident. She brought me homemade soup, a Sudoku book, and things to read. Our short visit lasted for several hours. Such fun making new friends.

Once again, TheSkiDiva reaches far beyond the slopes for sisterhood and friendship.
 
#20
I'm new in Vermont and until recently, almost all my friends here are Ski Divas. Mr. Blizzard's large family, the folks at the ski shop where I work a few hours, and some women in my town trying to make progressive change are my other friends. Woman friends are essential, like breathing!
 

Staff online

Members Online