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Has anyone heard of 'Aesthetic Skiing?'

Discussion in 'General Skiing' started by ski diva, Jun 12, 2017.

  1. ski diva

    ski diva Administrator Staff Member

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    Apparently, this is something new that's being taught in a ski school in Austria. I read this article about it and I'm still not too sure what it looks like; I wish they had a video, too.
     
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  2. mustski

    mustski Ski Diva Extraordinaire

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    I also wish they had a video. The article says it's different than old school style, but it sounds very similar. When I am feeling tired, I sometimes go old school to rest and relax.
     
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  3. pinto

    pinto Ski Diva Extraordinaire

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    A little more (or, whence the other article was taken): https://www.zellamsee-kaprun.com/en...sthetic-skiing-in-zell-am-see-kaprun_pt-96823

    I don't know too much about all this, but it sounds like the way most people ski, anyway. I mean, racers and really athletic instructor types can do all the big-time carving, but I don't think most students ever get too close to it. This just takes what is happening anyway and calls it a success!
     
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  4. vickie

    vickie Ski Diva Extraordinaire

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    That's what I thought too. And I'm quite proud of my new-found success. Where's my trophy?
     
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  5. santacruz skier

    santacruz skier Angel Diva

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    Maybe I should have taken a lesson while in Austria..... Probably could use one anyhow.
     
  6. newboots

    newboots Angel Diva

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    Perfect for me! Easy success, is that happiness on skis?
    (Or do we enjoy working long and hard for our success?)
     
  7. W8N2SKI

    W8N2SKI Ski Diva Extraordinaire

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    Apparently, this is something that is building steam among US instructors. We are going to explore it at our "Gold Clinic" this coming season. It is specifically aimed, apparently, at us 50+ skiers. I'm still not willing to admit to needing to "take it easier," but I'm open to learning techniques that may come in handy when I actually get "old." :brr:
     
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  8. Skisailor

    Skisailor Angel Diva

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    Lol!

    I love seeing this because I think that ski instruction in the US has not placed a high enough priority on skiing efficiency! I really don't think this is just an older skier issue though. It affects everyone. There are efficient ways to ski and not so efficient ways to ski. By this I mean - ways that require more muscle and work, and ways that don't.

    But inserting efficiency does not necessarily mean removing speed or excitement or dynamic skiing!!

    I agree that what's being taught as the "perfect turn" by PSIA does not serve the average recreational skier very well.
    We teach so many skiers who are on snow 5-25 days a year and come from sea level to ski at elevation once a year for their big vacation. You'd think teaching efficiency would be really important. Right? Nope. They all want to be Ted Liggety and Mikaela Shiffrin.

    They talk about being "forward" but then spend a lot of time during the turn in a flexed position with their butts behind their heels.

    They use extension of both legs (rise up) to start to start the turn (against gravity) and then progressively flex in the second half so that you end up having to use your leg muscles big time in the high G force part of the turn. By contrast - flexing the outside leg to start the turn (going with gravity) using a long leg short leg initiation and then standing on that long leg in the second half, so you can resist those forces with your skeleton, is easy.

    No wonder people feel like they have to work out in the off season to be in shape for skiing!

    Anyway - I find I have to ski one way at our clinics and another way in my personal skiing.

    Ok - rant over.
    ⛷⛷⛷
     
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  9. newboots

    newboots Angel Diva

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    When you put it this way, I could sign on. My ski buddy tells me I'm doing much more work than I need to.
     
  10. Skisailor

    Skisailor Angel Diva

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  11. newboots

    newboots Angel Diva

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    I did enjoy it! Funny, with winter over I have to really think to recall the feeling of how I make a turn. I was afraid of this - losing my skill over the summer. I am hoping for muscle memory!
     
  12. bounceswoosh

    bounceswoosh Moderator & Angel Diva Staff Member

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    I used to feel this way. These days, it comes back pretty quickly. Of course, the tips that I don't completely own - the ones that aren't ingrained movement patterns - I have to relearn over the season. And sadly, the not so great ingrained movement patterns are still there, too. For that reason, taking a lesson ASAP puts me in a good place.

    As much as you're skiing, I imagine you'll quickly develop muscle memory that lasts through the summer.
     
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